Expanding by Four Feet

How to reduce the cost of orthotic outgrowth for children

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LEXINGTON Kids turn out to be way more expensive than anyone ever plans on. From the moment they find out they’re pregnant, until the day they die, moms are constantly stressed out about something to do with their children.

Imagine you were told you’re going to have twins! Double the fun, double the cost, right? Right.

Dr. Jamie Settles Carter can really understand what moms are going through because she’s got twins of her own on the way! Her little family is expanding by four feet!

The upcoming birth of her twins means that there will be two kids with runny noses, two kids with flat feet, or two kids with sprained ankles sustained during a basketball game … there is always the potential to see double.

When confronted with the news of twins, Carter immediately started thinking of all the things she would soon need two of and how to pay for all of these complications. This can definitely cause some undue stress to moms and dads alike. Kids are often unpredictable, and you never know when an unforeseen expense is going to arise. However, one thing you can be certain of is that kids are going to grow.

Sometimes it’s one shoe size a year and sometimes its five sizes in a few months. So, when mom and dad have concerns about paying hundreds of dollars for a pair of custom orthotics for their children that may only be able to use them for six months, it is understandable.

Carter can relate to the parents’ concerns and finds it extremely important to let the parents know that as a physician and a parent, she can understand how expensive children are. However, in addition, she can also understand the ramifications that can occur if treatment isn’t rendered quickly and appropriately.

“By discussing the consequences of lack of appropriate treatment for children, such as worsening of their flat feet leading to ankle and knee pain for the majority of their adult life, parents are more likely to respond favorably to the appropriate treatment plan,” Carter explains.

More Tips for Reducing the Stress of the Cost of Medically Necessary Orthotics:

Carter feels strongly that it is important to thoroughly educate parents on the specific “grow out plan” that the physician’s office and orthotic company provide. Oftentimes, there are cost breaks associated because the companies know that this can be a hardship on the parents.

An exceptional OTC device can take the temporary place of a custom orthotic. Something like “Little Steps” are much more cost efficient and do a really good job of not only treating painful feet, but also preventing debilitating future complications. This may be a lifesaving alternative to parents that are looking at having to purchase two or more pairs within a one year period of time.

It is always important to let the kids and parents know that the physician is concerned only about the best interest of the child. The physician is not the family’s financial planner, so should present them with the facts, give their professional opinion, and let them be a part of choosing the appropriate treatment for their child.

Carter is an expert in all aspects of foot and ankle surgery, as well as the latest techniques and procedures for treatment of heel pain, diabetes, ingrown toenails, and all other common foot and ankle conditions. Due to her extensive background in wound care, she has a particular place in her heart for diabetics that are looking for a podiatrist that will listen and work with them to achieve a healthy outcome. When she designs a comprehensive treatment plan, she takes into account the patient’s personal needs, lifestyle, age, occupation, and limitations.

By discussing the consequences of lack of appropriate treatment for children, such as worsening of their flat feet leading to ankle and knee pain for the majority of their adult life, parents are more likely to respond favorably to the appropriate treatment plan.— Dr. Jamie Settles Carter

Elise Hinchman is the office manager and marketing director for Lexington Podiatry.